Wetenschap - 1 januari 1970

The student accommodation office SSHW expects a shortage of anywhere

The student accommodation office SSHW expects a shortage of anywhere

The student accommodation office SSHW expects a shortage of anywhere

between 500 and 1000 rooms by 2007, largely due to the anticipated increase
in international student numbers.
From September this year about 100 new Chinese students are expected
annually from the Chinese Agricultural University in Beijing. Most of these
will spend about four years in Wageningen. If the transfer of the
agricultural school Larenstein from Deventer takes place in 2005, another
300 students will also need housing. Plans to demolish the flats in the
Rijnsteeg and the Walstraat have been shelved, although these buildings
need a lot of renovation. SSHW wants to build accommodation for another
1000 students, and is discussing options with Wageningen University and the
municipality.
British animal scientist Professor Robert McNeill Alexander, American
nutritional expert Professor Walter Willet and the Kenyan
paleoanthropologist and conservationist Dr Richard Leakey will receive
honorary doctorates from Wageningen University. These will be awarded
during the 85th Dies Natalis celebrations of Wageningen University on 9
March. Queen Beatrix will be present to hand out the awards; Leakey, the
best known of the three, is a good friend of the House of Orange. Leakey is
being awarded the honorary doctorate for his scientific contribution to
nature management.

Research carried out by Wageningen scientists in rural areas of Bangladesh
has indicated that many mothers do not get enough food to be able to
breastfeed their babies.
Almost half of the breastfed babies in the study weighed too little. The
familiar story from Western nutrition experts that breast is best because
it contains proteins that stimulate the baby’s immune system does not seem
to hold up. The 252 women in the study all ate less than 1500 kilocalories
a day, which was not sufficient to make breast milk for their babies. The
birth weight of almost half of the children was less than 2500 grams, and
their mothers’ milk was not sufficient to help them grow.

Although apples are an important source of protective substances, only a
fraction of these substances are found in apple juice, according to
researchers at ATO and the Product Design and Quality Management group.
Juice obtained from squeezed apples only had ten percent of the protective
effect of the antioxidants found in whole apples. Juice obtained by
treating apples with enzymes scored even worse, with only three percent of
the protective effect. The Wageningen researchers discovered that the cause
of the reduced nutritional effect is the disappearance of substances such
as catechin and chlorogenic acid, which remain behind in the pulp.

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