Wetenschap - 1 januari 1970

Summary

Summary

Summary


The Executive Board of Wageningen UR has now agreed with the directors of
the five expertise groups on new names for each.
The idea behind the new names, which all have the same format of forename
and surname, is to increase the uniform identity of Wageningen UR,
especially for the outside world. The Animal Sciences Group – Wageningen UR
is the group that goes the furthest in bringing all research institutes
under the same name. This means that ID-Lelystad and RIVO will no longer be
called by their old names. Other research institutes such as Alterra, ATO,
IMAG and LEI will retain their existing names. The new concept will be
further worked out and gradually introduced over the coming months.

From February there will be a helpdesk in the Central Administration Office
for information on immigration procedures.
The desk will provide help to appointed representatives of Sciences Groups,
IAC and Education and Student Affairs (OSA). There have been considerable
changes in the regulations and procedures for foreign students, PhD
researchers and visiting staff, and it is important that the staff at
Wageningen UR know where they can find help with processing the
applications. The helpdesk will be situated within the Central Student
Administration as this is where the most information and knowledge on
procedures can be found.

The Plant Sciences Group – Wageningen UR will receive seven million euros
from the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture for research on the potato disease
phytophthora (blight).
The aim of the research is to find sustainable solutions to control the
disease. The money will be made available over a period of four years. It
will enable Wageningen University, Plant Research International (PRI), and
Applied Plant Research (PPO) to start work on the umbrella plan they
proposed last year for combined research. The plan, which had also been
presented to businesses in the potato sector, had been shelved due to lack
of funds, but can now go ahead thanks to this contribution, together with
money already awarded for genomics research.

Wageningen Professor Martijn Katan has an article in Science in which he
claims that Europe has to move away from the idea that food cannot make
consumers more healthy.
If there is scientific evidence that indicates that certain foods can
reduce the chance of diseases, American manufacturers are allowed to
publish these claims on the packaging. Europe would rather that consumers
go to their physician instead of trying to cure themselves. Katan
understands this, but argues that this view prevents consumers from eating
foods that could help them anyway.

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