Student - November 1, 2011

Go greener: cook together

Idealis has appealed to students to eat together more often. It saves energy. So does taking shorter showers, using the stairs and wearing thick socks.

Normal 0 21 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE These tips are part of the energy-saving campaign ‘That was easy’ launched by the housing provider today. Idealis aims to prod students into save energy. One idea is to change their cooking habits and eat together from one pot. The tone of the campaign is light-hearted. ‘Everyone already knows how to save energy, really’, says Idealis spokesperson Corina van Dijk. ‘But actually doing it is something else. So that’s why we go for a bit of a tongue-in-cheek campaign.’ Idealis will be attempting to steer behaviour change through thought-provoking posters and stickers. There are also tips and tricks on energy-saving on the Idealis website.
Students’ turn
The main thing, according to Van Dijk, is not just to save energy directly by switching off equipment you are not using, for example. ‘Using material sustainably is important too. For example, by cooking together instead of individually and one after the other, by making one-pot meals, and by using seasonal local vegetables.’
The campaign follows steps taken by Idealis to bring down energy consumption in the student residences. By installing new boilers, water-saving taps and above all by using energy-saving building materials, Idealis has brought down consumption by 10 percent. Now it is the students’ turn.
From mid-December, students will be able to keep track of how they are doing. Van Dijk: ‘We are going to work out the consumption figures for each residence. This won’t be the overall consumption but the actual use by residents.’ RK These tips are part of the energy-saving campaign 'That was easy' launched by the housing provider today. Idealis aims to prod students into save energy. One idea is to change their cooking habits and eat together from one pot. The tone of the campaign is light-hearted. 'Everyone already knows how to save energy, really', says Idealis spokesperson Corina van Dijk. 'But actually doing it is something else. So that's why we go for a bit of a tongue-in-cheek campaign.' Idealis will be attempting to steer behaviour change through thought-provoking posters and stickers. There are also tips and tricks on energy-saving on the Idealis website.
Students' turn
The main thing, according to Van Dijk, is not just to save energy directly by switching off equipment you are not using, for example. 'Using material sustainably is important too. For example, by cooking together instead of individually and one after the other, by making one-pot meals, and by using seasonal local vegetables.'
The campaign follows steps taken by Idealis to bring down energy consumption in the student residences. By installing new boilers, water-saving taps and above all by using energy-saving building materials, Idealis has brought down consumption by 10 percent. Now it is the students' turn.
From mid-December, students will be able to keep track of how they are doing. Van Dijk: 'We are going to work out the consumption figures for each residence. This won't be the overall consumption but the actual use by residents.' RK 

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