Student - 10 november 2016

Death

Sportspeople who think about death perform better, psychologists at the University of Arizona have discovered. The got men to play basketball and in between games had them fill in questionnaires, some of which made reference to their mortality while others didn’t. The basketballers with the ‘death questions’ scored 40 percent higher in the next game. By performing better we unconsciously try to keep death at bay. Question of do or die!

Yes means yes

Before students at Berkeley are let in to a party on the campus they will from now on have to listen to two minutes of education about sexual consent They are required then to confirm that they know what ‘yes means yes’ means. The aim is to address the problem of sexual violence. Twenty two women were raped on the campus last year.   

First child

The timing of your first child is (partly) to do with your genes. Researchers at the University of Groningen and other institutes have identified 24 genes which have an influence on that timing. The same genes are also involved in matters such as the first menstruation, voice breaking or the start of menopause. If you’re worried that you don’t have any say in the matter: altogether the genes only predict one percent of the cases.

Daylight

The length of the day makes the biggest contribution to our mental wellbeing. This factor is more important than whether it rains, the air is polluted or the sun shines brightly all day. Researchers at Brigham Young University discovered this by comparing meteorological data with data from psychotherapists’ patients. The shorter the daylight hours, the fuller the waiting rooms.


Re:ageer