Wetenschap - 8 oktober 1998

English Summary

English Summary

English Summary
  • Agronomists consider AIDS to be a medical problem. Wrong, says Tanzanian Gabriel Rugalema. In the northern part of Tanzania, which is heavily affected by AIDS, the farmers are cultivating crops which require little labour out of sheer necessity. Agricultural households increasingly consist of orphans, and extension officers, provided they are not ill or passed away, have no suitable recommendations for these households. Rugalema, who did his PhD research on the influence of AIDS on agriculture at the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague, now has a postdoctoral position at the WAU Technology and Agrarian Development Chair. New research should concentrate on non-labour-intensive crops, says his supervisor Paul Richards
  • Famous Dutch nature film maker Hugo van Lawick, known for his movies People of The Forest and The Leopard Son, was in Wageningen to present his new movie Serengeti Symphony. The former spouse of Jane Goodall, now 61 years old, has lived and worked for more than 35 years near the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. When I came to the Serengeti, I used to see a rhinoceros everyday. Now it's nearly impossible to see them; there are only five rhinoceros left, in a special area in the park, guarded day and night. He is anxious that the wildlife parks are becoming like zoos, fenced off to protect the animals against poachers. A large part of the grassland for the gnus is outside the parks. A fence would kill them.
  • Although Dutch farmers complain a lot, their income increased in 1997 by 19 percent, while British and Portuguese farmers suffered decreases of 22 and 13 percent of their incomes. But there is no reason for satisfaction, says economist Huib Silvis of LEI-DLO. Dutch farmers' income development does not compare favourably with that of their European colleagues over the past five years and the differences in income between Dutch farmers are big. Some fifteen percent of the Dutch farmers earned less money than people on social security in 1997
  • Need a TV? Have a look at Arne Zijlstra's room in the Hoevestein flat building. He has a wall of 67 TV sets in his room. He started to collect and repair TVs four years ago and has sold about two hundred since. He collects old TV sets in the morning and usually manages to fix two out of three discarded TVs. Seventh-year student Zijlstra, who doesn't receive a grant anymore, ekes out a spartan living from his hobby. MSc students can also rent a TV for a few months from Zijlstra

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