Wetenschap - 18 juni 1998

English Summary

English Summary

English Summary
  • WAU is cooperating with a number of organisations to develop the internet site Green City Wageningen. Up to now it has cost a cool half million guilders and this year they will pour another quarter of a million in, this all while the site is only used by 35 visitors a day. The site, which promised to be the address for agricultural knowledge, is mainly in Dutch and consists of a few outdated articles from the WUB and links to the WAU and DLO internet pages. A waste of money? We have booked a lot of invisible results, comments director Robert Blom of the University, one of those responsible for the site. Others claim that the development of Green City Wageningen focused too much on technology and not on the contents of the site, let alone the interests of potential users. Public affairs-member Gert van Maanen thinks it's a piece of Internet scrap, but he is confident that the new manager will be able to salvage it
  • A group of seven international students from Eastern European countries have studied Europe's most extensive area of wetlands in the southern part of Belarus. They conclude that a hot spot of biodiversity is disappearing in the area, because large parts of the wetlands have been transformed into agricultural land. The policy makers in Belarus don't realise that the wetlands are of tremendous value to society, says international student Jozef Kordik. The students have proposed that the wetlands should be included under the Ramsar Treaty in one administrative unit, to attract foreign investors in ecotourism and environmentally-friendly technologies. Otherwise, they believe the wetlands will change into wasteland
  • The new town council in Wageningen has ambitious and expensive plans for the coming four years. It wants to abolish the use of herbicides in the public parks and change the plants. It also intends to support the building of an ice-skating rink and wants to replace the harbour outside town. We need five to ten times more money to implement all our plans than out budget allows us to do, says one councillor. He's sure that the local taxes will have to rise
  • Biotech company Keygene NV opened its new extension in Wageningen last week. The company started nine years ago, when five Dutch seed companies, Keygene's shareholders, joined hands. On the basis of AFLP, a genetic marker technique, Keygene has developed into a world-leader in screening plant genomes, with seventy researchers and an annual turnover of twelve million guilders. It will extend its research in the coming years, says CEO Mark Vaeck, turning its attention to the multi-genetic expression of useful plant properties for the agrofood industry

  • Re:ageer