Wetenschap - 5 maart 1998

English Summary

English Summary

English Summary
  • The social scientists in Wageningen should reformulate the research agendas of the technical scientists so that they direct their research more towards social problems and needs, a committee of social scientists argued last week. Cited as an example: animal scientists should aim their research more at public rehabilitation of the pig industry in the Netherlands, paying more attention to the pigs health, the environment and ethical questions. In a response, two animal breeders point out that they welcome the increasing influence of social questions on their research programme, but this influence comes from the breeding companies, Ministry of Agriculture and consumer scientists rather than from sociologists and philosophers in Wageningen
  • Peat moor ecosystems play an important role in global climate changes - they store an enormous amount of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Graduate Monique Heijmans transported large pieces of peat soil from a moor to Wageningen in order to simulate future atmospheric conditions. She found out that nitrogen, from traffic and animal production, hinders the growth of the peat and warms up the earth. She also treated the peat with extra carbon dioxide. The peat liked it; it grew three times faster than normal
  • Scientists and policy makers in the Netherlands want to produce new nature. A contradiction in terms: what is nature when diggers are used to shape a natural environment, wild horses in the reserves have to be saved from rising water levels and beavers are introduced to the applause of officials? The meaning of the expression new nature is not clear and, as a result, the supporters and opponents of this new nature cannot come to terms with each other. A clear vision of the social and cultural value of this type of nature would help
  • Wageningen Agricultural University will celebrate its 80th anniversary on Friday 6 March. Rector Cees Karssen foresees a growth of fundamental research in Wageningen, whereby scientists will cooperate in knowledge networks with other universities, research institutes and commercial companies. Science does not create innovation, the reverse is the case, states the Rector. The use of knowledge by others will lead to a lot more questions of a fundamental nature. Exchanging knowledge with applied scientists in and outside Wageningen will therefore strengthen rather weaken the position of the University in future, concludes Karssen

  • Re:ageer