Wetenschap - 23 februari 1997

English Summary

English Summary

English Summary
  • Some educational institutes of the WAU want to save money by combining the MSc courses and the Dutch programmes. The lecturers will have to convey their knowledge in English. This may cause problems. Dutch students don't want courses in English; they try to avoid them, says the Biotechnology course director, Henk van den Broek. That's right, says Dutch student David Redeker, Some lecturers find it difficult enough to teach in Dutch, let alone in English. Increasing the number of courses given in English will not only save money, but will also open up a larger part of the WAU education for foreign students
  • What will we eat in the year 2040? The researchers from the Sustainable Technological Development programme, sponsored by five Dutch ministries, are trying to improve the efficiency of food production by a factor of twenty in terms of reducing the damage caused to the environment. Their futuristic view: vegetables will be grown above the ground in industrial buildings; the production of meat will decline drastically and bacteria and fungi that produce proteins, will increasingly take over. The farmers will become rural caretakers who integrate the production of food, clean water, energy, nature and recreation. A lot of new technical equipment will be needed to create this future agriculture, but the research programme does not take the needs of the consumers into account, one participant pointed out
  • The Wageningen market on Wednesday mornings is the biggest market in the area, but its regional impact has weakened over the past years. The municipality wants to reshape the market square to make it more attractive for economic and cultural events, while the market committee wants to attract more market vendors so that there is more diversity in the products on offer, like the duvets which are often bought by visitors to the university from Southern Europe
  • One out of eleven WAU graduates fails to find a job after completing their study. This percentage is higher than the national average. Although Dutch industry is currently creating a lot of new jobs, most of these are in the field of information technology and within small enterprises. Jobs in agriculture and nature conservation are not part of the new job market. PhD graduates from Wageningen are also more often unemployed than their colleagues from other Dutch universities
  • The merger of the WAU and the DLO institutes for agricultural research is still tied up in red tape, because Minister of Agriculture, Jozias van Aartsen, has not yet appointed a new chairman of Brainport Wageningen. WAU students complain that the discussion surrounding the future tasks of the new organisation is limited to an inner circle, which is not communicating with the shop-floor about the coming reorganisation

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